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When listening to a natural environment, one can sense and process a huge range of complex information spread on a variety of arrangements in the frequency and time domain. All this sonic information, created by the objects, beings and happenings around us is interpreted, i.e.  as a dog barking far ahead to the right, a big dog. An analysis is done, on the brain, that uses the differences on the sound heard on each ear to locate the sound source’s position on space and the listening environment through acoustic characteristics (whether is reflective, quite, noisy).

It follows that we want to create sound as it is heard on the natural environment, taking acoustic cues as guides to synthesize it, and once these cues have been learned and abstracted, they can be used to create sounds that would not normally exist, but can behave as if they did.

Further on this chapter:

0. CONTENT

2. SOUND SYNTHESIS

2.1 SONIFICATION

2.1.1 SONIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND CONCEPTS

2.2 SPATIALIZATION

2.2.1 ACOUSTICS INVOLVED IN SPATIALIZATION

2.2.1.1 COORDINATES SYSTEM

2.2.1.2 DELAY AND GAIN

2.2.1.3 REFLECTIONS

2.2.1.4 SOUND ACQUIREMENT

2.2.2 SPATIALIZATION TECHNIQUES

2.2.2.1 ViMiC

2.2.2.1.1 BASIC FUNCTIONING 

2.2.2.2 JAMOMA

2.2.2.2.1 VIMIC MODULES

2.2.2.2.2 OUTPUT MODULES

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